Day: January 18, 2019

Stocks making the biggest moves midday: Netflix, Boeing, Tesla, Eli Lilly & more

Check out the companies making headlines midday Friday this week:

Netflix — Shares of the video-streaming giant fell 4 percent after issuing weaker-than-expected guidance for the first quarter of 2019. The company also posted lighter-than-expected revenue for the fourth quarter of 2018.

Schlumberger — Schlumberger’s stock rose more than 8 percent and posted its biggest one-day gain since 2011. The jump came after the company issued upbeat guidance for 2019. CEO Paal Kibsgaard said in a statement Schlumberger expects “expect a more positive supply- and demand-balance sentiment to lead to a gradual recovery in the price of oil over the course of the year.”

American Express — The Dow component fell on the back of disappointing quarterly results before recovering. American Express reported adjusted fourth quarter earnings of $1.74 per share and revenue of $10.47 billion. Analysts polled by Refinitv expected a profit of $1.80 per share and sales of $10.56 billion.

Boeing, Caterpillar — Shares of Boeing and Caterpillar rose 1.6 percent and 2.2 percent, respectively. The rise came after sources told CNBC that China has offered to boost U.S. imports for six years during ongoing trade talks.

Pilgrim’s Pride, Sanderson Farms —The chicken producers rose more than 6.5 percent each. An analyst at Mizuho Securities cited the recent thawing in U.S.-China trade talks, noting: “The long-awaited reopening of the China market would be unquestionably good news for US producers as China is by far the largest (and virtually only) market for chicken byproducts (paws and wing tips).”

V.F. Corp. — Shares of V.F. Corp. shot up more than 12 percent after the apparel company posted better-than-expected earnings. The company posted earnings per share of $1.16 percent, topping a $1.10 estimate.

Eli Lilly — Eli Lilly’s stock fell 2.2 percent in midday trading after the company announced that a phase 3 study of Lartruvo failed. Lartruvo is a drug that aims to treat cancer.

U.S. Concrete, Vulcan Materials, Eagle Materials, Summit Materials — Construction stocks rose broadly after Reuters reported that President Donald Trump is trying to revive support for an infrastructure plan that would last up to 13 years.

Tesla —The electric car maker’s stock dropped nearly 13 percent after the company announced it would cut 7 percent of its workforce. CEO Elon Musk said in an email that Tesla faces a “very difficult” road ahead.

Jack Bogle feared this one thing most and it drove him to revolutionize investing with Vanguard

The CNBC says, Former Vanguard Group Chairman and CEO F. William McNabb told CNBC that his first meeting with Jack Bogle, and the one that made a lasting impression on him, was his interview for a product manager position at the fund company in 1986.

Bogle, the founder of Vanguard who is credited with revolutionizing the investment business, had his feet propped up during the interview because of “doctor’s orders” while he recovered from a heart attack. “It’s the only concession I’ll make to be in the office,” McNabb recalled Bogle saying.

At the time, McNabb was working on Wall Street after graduating from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, but Bogle didn’t ask McNabb one question about his resume. Instead, they talked about values, education and books.

It was emblematic of the type of company Bogle had built and of his legacy, McNabb told CNBC. Bogle died Wednesday at age 89.

This ‘90s Jack Bogle interview shows how little his famous investing strategy changed over the years.

Bogle believed that culture trumped strategy every time and that Vanguard would be a place where everyone’s contribution was valued and respected, McNabb told CNBC on Friday. The culture Bogle fostered at Vanguard was one of hard work, treating everyone with respect, always doing the right thing and putting clients’ interests first, McNabb said.

Bogle feared complacency. He was inspired by the writings of American revolutionary Thomas Paine, who was often quoted in Bogle’s books, and the economist Joseph Schumpeter, who popularized the term “creative destruction.” What other industry executives found disruptive, Bogle thought necessary to remain relevant.

“When you look at Vanguard today, we are a result of a lot of those steps,” said McNabb.

In its first year, Vanguard managed $1.7 billion of customer assets, and when Bogle stepped down as CEO, Vanguard had reached $250 billion assets under management. The company now manages $5.1 trillion, largely because of the popularity of Bogle’s industry-changing idea: index mutual funds.

McNabb became CEO of Vanguard two weeks before the fall of Lehman Brothers in 2008. Amidst the turmoil of the financial crisis, he asked himself, “what would Jack do?,” and recalls Bogle’s favorite phrase: Press on, regardless.