Category: International

U.S. Import and Export Price Indexes summary

COEUSA, May 13 - U.S. import prices were unchanged in April, after increasing 2.9 percent in March, the U.S. Bureau of Labor 
Statistics reported today. Higher nonfuel prices in April offset lower fuel prices. Prices for U.S. exports
advanced 0.6 percent in April following a 4.1-percent increase the previous month.

Imports

The price index for U.S. imports was unchanged in April, after rising 6.8 percent over the first quarter of
2022. U.S. import prices have not recorded a monthly decline since the index fell 0.4 percent in December
2021. Prices for U.S. imports advanced 12.0 percent for the year ended in April, down from the 13.0-percent
increase recorded last month. (See table 1.)

Fuel Imports: Import fuel prices declined 2.4 percent in April following a 39.2-percent increase from
December to March. The decrease in April was the first 1-month drop since the index fell 7.7 percent in
December 2021. Lower petroleum prices in April more than offset higher natural gas prices. Despite the
decrease in April, import fuel prices rose 64.3 percent over the past 12 months. Petroleum prices fell 2.9
percent in April, after advancing 19.4 percent the previous month. In contrast, natural gas prices increased
6.8 percent in April following a 9.5-percent decline in March. Petroleum and natural gas prices rose over the
past year, advancing 63.0 percent and 102.2 percent, respectively.

All Imports Excluding Fuel: Prices for nonfuel imports increased 0.4 percent in April following advances
of 1.2 percent, 0.9 percent, and 1.4 percent the 3 previous months. Nonfuel import prices have not recorded
a 1-month drop since the index decreased 0.2 percent in November 2020. Higher prices for nonfuel
industrial supplies and materials; capital goods; foods, feeds, and beverages; and automotive vehicles all
contributed to the April increase in nonfuel import prices. The price index for nonfuel imports rose on a 12-
month basis, advancing 7.2 percent.

Foods, Feeds, and Beverages: Foods, feeds, and beverages prices increased 0.9 percent in April, after rising
0.4 percent in March. Prices for foods, feeds, and beverages have not recorded a monthly decline since the
index fell 0.1 percent in November 2021; the index advanced 12.1 percent for the year ended in April.

Nonfuel Industrial Supplies and Materials: Prices for nonfuel industrial supplies and materials rose 0.6
percent in April following a 4.6-percent advance in March. Higher prices in April for steelmaking materials,
fertilizer, and steel mill products more than offset lower prices for unfinished building materials and
precious metals.

Finished Goods: Prices for most of the major finished goods categories increased in April. Import capital
goods prices advanced 0.4 percent for the second consecutive month and the index increased 3.8 percent for
the year ended in April. The 12-month rise in capital goods prices was the largest over-the-year advance
since September 1992. The price index for automotive vehicles also increased in April, rising 0.3 percent
following a 0.1-percent advance in March. Prices for consumer goods were unchanged in April, the first
time the index has not recorded a monthly increase since February 2021.
Exports 

U.S. export prices rose 0.6 percent in April following a 10.5-percent advance from December to March.
Higher prices for both agricultural and nonagricultural exports contributed to the overall increase in U.S.
export prices in April. The price index for U.S. exports rose 18.0 percent over the past year. (See table 2.)

Agricultural Exports: The price index for agricultural exports advanced 1.1 percent in April, after
increasing 4.3 percent the previous month. Agricultural export prices have not declined on a monthly basis
since September 2021. Higher prices in April for corn, cotton, meat, and nuts more than offset lower prices
for wheat and soybeans. Prices for agricultural exports rose 20.9 percent from April 2021 to April 2022, led
by higher prices for wheat, soybeans, corn, cotton, and meat.

All Exports Excluding Agriculture: Prices for nonagricultural exports advanced 0.5 percent in April
following increases of 4.1 percent in March, 3.3 percent in February, and 2.8 percent in January. In April,
higher prices for capital goods; nonagricultural industrial supplies and materials; automotive vehicles; and
consumer goods all contributed to the rise in nonagricultural export prices. The price index for
nonagricultural exports advanced 17.6 percent for the year ended in April, led by higher nonagricultural
industrial supplies and materials prices.

Nonagricultural Industrial Supplies and Materials: Nonagricultural industrial supplies and materials prices
increased 0.4 percent in April following a 20.7-percent advance from December to March. Higher prices for
chemicals and nonferrous metals more than offset a 1.3-percent drop in fuel prices. Despite the April
decline, export fuel prices rose 72.8 percent over the past year.

Finished Goods: Prices for each of the major finished goods categories advanced in April. Capital goods
prices increased 0.9 percent following consecutive 0.4-percent advances in March and February and a 0.9-
percent rise in January. Prices for export capital goods increased 5.1 percent for the year ended in April, the
largest 12-month advance since September 1982. The price index for automotive vehicles rose 0.8 percent
in April and consumer goods prices advanced 0.5 percent for the same period.

More information for the major import and export price indexes can be found at
www.bls.gov/web/ximpim/largest.htm.

Measures of Import and Export Prices by Locality

Imports by Locality of Origin: The price index for imports from China advanced 0.2 percent in April
following a 0.5-percent increase in March. The April rise was driven by higher prices for fabricated metal
products manufacturing. Prices for imports from China rose 4.6 percent over the past year. Import prices
from Japan advanced 0.3 percent in April, after increasing 0.5 percent the previous month. Prices for
imports from Japan rose 1.9 percent from April 2021 to April 2022. The price indexes for imports from the
European Union and Mexico also increased in April, advancing 0.2 percent and 0.6 percent, respectively. In
contrast, the price index for imports from Canada declined 1.4 percent, after rising 20.1 percent from
December to March. (See table 7.)

Exports by Locality of Destination: Export prices to China decreased 0.3 percent in April, the first
monthly drop since a 1.0-percent decline in December 2021. The decrease in April followed a 10.4-percent
rise from December to March. Despite the April drop, prices for exports to China advanced 14.5 percent
over the past 12 months. The price index for exports to Japan rose 0.7 percent in April following a 4.8-
percent increase in March. Export prices to Japan advanced 18.7 percent for the year ended in April, the
largest 12 month increase since May 2021. Prices for exports to the European Union fell 0.6 percent in
April, after rising 4.5 percent the previous month. The price index for exports to Canada increased 1.3
percent in April and export prices to Mexico rose 1.4 percent over the same period. (See table 8.)

Terms of Trade Indexes: Terms of trade indexes are based on country, region, or grouping and measure
the change in the purchasing power of exports relative to imports. U.S. terms of trade with China declined
0.5 percent in April, after rising 9.0 percent from December to March. Higher import prices from China and
decreasing export prices to China each contributed to the April drop in the U.S. terms of trade. Despite the
April decline, the index for U.S. terms of trade with China rose 9.4 percent from April 2021 to April 2022.
U.S. terms of trade with Japan advanced 0.4 percent in April following a 4.2-percent increase in March.
U.S. terms of trade with Japan rose 16.5 percent for the year ended in April, the largest over-the-year
advance since a 17.1-percent increase in May 2021. U.S. terms of trade with the European Union decreased
0.8 percent in April, after rising 3.1 percent the previous month. The index for U.S. terms of trade with
Canada advanced 2.8 percent in April and U.S. terms of trade with Mexico increased 0.8 percent over the
same period. (See table 9.)

Import and Export Services

Imports: Import air passenger fares advanced 3.6 percent in April following an 8.6-percent rise in March
and a 6.1-percent increase in February. In April, higher Asian, Latin American/Caribbean, and European
fares all contributed to the overall advance. Import air passenger fares rose 14.2 percent over the past year,
the largest 12-month increase since September 2021. Prices for import air freight declined 4.6 percent in
April, after increasing 2.7 percent the previous month. Import air freight prices advanced 6.5 percent from
April 2021 to April 2022. (See table 10.)

Exports: The index for export air passenger fares ticked up 0.1 percent in April following a 7.0-percent
advance in March. Higher Latin American/Caribbean fares in April offset declining Asian and European
fares. Export air passenger fares rose 9.7 percent for the year ended in April. Export air freight prices were
unchanged in April, after advances of 4.6 percent and 6.3 percent the previous 2 months. Prices for export
air freight have not recorded a 1-month decline since July 2021 and rose 23.3 percent over the past year.
The April 12-month advance was the largest over-the-year increase since the index rose 23.7 percent in
August 2008.

U.S. Import and Export Price Index data for May 2022 are scheduled for release on Wednesday, June 15, 2022
at 8:30 a.m. (ET).

New Foreign Direct Investment in the United States, 2020

Expenditures by foreign direct investors to acquire, establish, or expand U.S. businesses totaled $120.7 billion (preliminary) in 2020. Expenditures were down 45.4 percent from $221.2 billion (revised) in 2019 and below the annual average of $314.4 billion for 2014-2019. As in previous years, acquisitions of existing businesses accounted for a large majority of total expenditures.

In 2020, expenditures for acquisitions were $116.3 billion, expenditures to establish new U.S. businesses were $1.9 billion, and expenditures to expand existing foreign-owned businesses were $2.4 billion. Planned total expenditures, which include both first-year and planned future expenditures, were $135.8 billion.

Expenditures by industry, country, and state in 2020

By industry, expenditures for new direct investment were largest in manufacturing, at $63.3 billion, accounting for 52.4 percent of total expenditures. Within manufacturing, expenditures were largest in chemical manufacturing ($26.9 billion) and computers and electronic products ($14.8 billion). There were also notable expenditures in information ($17.4 billion), primarily telecommunications.

By country of ultimate beneficial owner (UBO), the largest investing country was Germany, with expenditures of $20.5 billion. Canada ($15.2 billion) was the second largest country, followed by Switzerland ($13.8 billion). By region, Europe contributed two-thirds of new investment in 2020.

By U.S. state, Texas received the largest investment, with expenditures of $18.6 billion, followed by California ($17.8 billion) and New Jersey ($14.1 billion).

Greenfield expenditures

Greenfield investment expenditures—expenditures to either establish a new U.S. business or to expand an existing foreign-owned U.S. business—were $4.4 billion in 2020. Total planned expenditures until completion for greenfield investment initiated in 2020, which include both first-year and future expenditures, were $19.5 billion.

By U.S. industry, greenfield expenditures in 2020 were largest in manufacturing ($1.3 billion) and utilities ($1.1 billion). By region of UBO, Europe ($2.2 billion) and Asia and Pacific ($1.7 billion) had the largest expenditures. By U.S. state, Texas received the highest level of greenfield investment ($1.0 billion).

Employment by newly acquired, established, or expanded foreign-owned businesses

In 2020, employment at newly acquired, established, or expanded foreign-owned businesses in the United States was 197,500 employees. Current employment of acquired enterprises was 194,000. Total planned employment, which includes the current employment of acquired enterprises, the planned employment of newly established business enterprises when fully operational, and the planned employment associated with expansions, was 206,500.

By industry, retail trade accounted for the largest number of employees (between 50,000 and 100,000)1followed by manufacturing (30,900), primarily chemical manufacturing. By country of UBO, Canada accounted for the largest number of employees (112,400), followed by the United Kingdom (10,100) and the United Kingdom Islands in the Caribbean, which include the British Virgin Islands and Cayman Islands (7,400).

By U.S. state, Texas had the largest employment (between 50,000 and 100,000), followed by California (21,000) and Arizona (9,300). Employment for an acquired entity that operated in multiple states is attributed to the state in which it had the greatest number of employees.

第三十届世界亚裔小姐美国总决赛在洛杉矶成功落幕

12月8日由美国国际商会主办的2018第三十届世界亚裔小姐选美大赛美国总决赛,在具有百年历史的美国洛杉矶千禧酒店成功落下帷幕。

参加本届美国总决赛的18位参赛佳丽,经过民族服装、泳装、运动装、才艺表演、礼服和机智问答环节的激烈竞赛,加州州立大学波莫纳分校酒店管理专业的美国亚裔参赛佳丽波尔瓦尼以最高得分摘得桂冠,荣获2018世界亚裔小姐冠军称号;来自中国四川电影电视学院播音主持专业的本科学生张语轩荣获本届总决赛亚军,第三名季军由来自蒙古国的参赛佳丽吉布呼兰摘取。

本届总决赛的参赛佳丽们才貌双全,光彩夺目,具有高学历、才艺高的特点,分别荣获了专项奖。

出任本届总决赛的评委均是来自美国好莱坞演艺、电影、时尚届的知名人士和业界的翘楚,他们的加入突显了本届大赛评审的专业性和权威性。大赛特邀嘉宾也都是政界、工商界、艺术界的成功人士,他们对本届大赛参赛选手、组织策划、灯光舞美都给予了高度评价。

中国赛区选送赴美的本届参赛佳丽均表现优秀,张语轩荣获了世界亚裔小姐总决赛亚军,吴桢蕙荣获世界亚裔小姐形象大使奖和最佳泳装展示奖,赵梦婷、王海燕分别荣获世界亚裔小姐最佳魅力奖和世界亚裔小姐最佳上镜奖,通过世界亚裔小姐选美大赛的顶级舞台展示了中国参赛佳丽的亮丽风彩。

加州洛杉矶郡政府在大赛颁奖典礼现场对美国国际商会主办第三十届世界亚裔小姐大赛所作出的杰出成就与贡献颁发了荣誉奖状,表彰美国国际商会,以及联合主办方美国全美电视台为促进国际文化交流所作出努力和杰出贡献。

美国国际商会主席豪姆斯·司特乐表示,感谢联合主办单位、协办单位及承办单位的协作与支持,感谢执行团队的努力工作,特别感谢各赞助商的大力支持,本届世界亚裔小姐选美大赛再次将美国与世界联接在一起,增进各国人民友谊,促进共同发展繁荣,展示了世界人民和谐发展共同繁荣美好愿望。

美国国际商会执行主席、世界亚裔小姐选美大赛组委会执行主席秦嘉豪在总决赛颁奖典礼现场表示,2019世界亚裔小姐选美大赛即将启动,全球范围内的报名海选也将展开,欢迎国际知名企业参与支持,携手合作、共创辉煌。

作为具有公益性质的本届大赛得到了美国及海外媒体的大力合作,获得了包括达美航空、中国南方航空、联盟知库等知名企业和机构的鼎力赞助与合作支持,使得2018第三十届世界亚裔小姐选美大赛美国总决赛盛典再创辉煌,成功圆满落下帷幕。

世界亚裔小姐选美大赛1980年代初期创办于美国加州洛杉矶,即将到来的2019年将迎来第31届。世界亚裔小姐选美大赛是美国国际商会拥有的知名大赛品牌之一,是最具知名度的世界性亚裔选美盛典,也是目前世界性最顶级的选美大赛。大赛每年在世界范围内主办和推广赛事活动,旨在鼓励优秀亚裔佳丽的文化自信和女神风范。通过在全球范围内公开遴选、甄评和推介出的“世界亚裔小姐选美大赛”获奖者,均是优秀亚裔女性代表,她们在形体、知性和心灵塑造方面所展现出来的东方之美,是整个亚裔女性整体特征的缩影,也是全球亚裔族群共同的骄傲。

Foreign Direct Investment Strengthens America’s High-Tech Competitiveness

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High-Tech Industry Employment Concentration, High-Tech Employment/All Employment, by Metro Area, 2015. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2015 County Business Patterns.

By Maureen Book, Research Analyst, SelectUSA
SelectUSA recently released its second industry-focused report: “High-Tech Industries: The Role of FDI in Driving Innovation and Growth.”

This report provides an in-depth look at high-tech clusters in the United States and gives the first-ever analysis of the role of foreign direct investment (FDI) in high-tech industries. The report’s biggest takeaway is that FDI plays a significant role in these industries.

Where Are High-Tech Clusters?

High-tech industries are defined as employing more than twice the concentration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) workers compared to the national average. After analyzing the U.S. high-tech industry and considering participation of both foreign and domestic firms, SelectUSA explored the geography of high-tech companies in the United States by state, to identify large groups, or clusters, of employment. The top employers of high-tech workers were California, Texas and New York, while the District of Columbia, Virginia and Washington boast the highest employment per capita of high-tech jobs.

High-Tech Clusters by Metro Area

Looking at metro areas with the highest concentration of high-tech employment, SelectUSA found that San Jose, Calif., tops the list with more than 34 percent of local employment in high-tech industries. It was followed closely by Elkhart, Ind., with nearly 33 percent, and Huntsville, Ala., with over 31 percent.

While the concentration in San Jose might not be surprising because it is the largest city in the Silicon Valley, Elkhart and Huntsville both have industry concentrations nearby to make them important locations for high-tech companies. Elkhart’s economy is heavily concentrated in the transportation equipment manufacturing industry and centers around recreational and commercial vehicle manufacturing. While Huntsville is home to many military technology firms and aerospace and defense contractors.

The Role of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI)
Using our definition of high-tech industries and data published by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, SelectUSA looked at the role that FDI plays in high-tech industries. FDI generally involves not only monetary investment, but the management of a company by a foreign enterprise. To be considered FDI, the investment must usually be linked with the real output of the country in which it operates.

Our data found that FDI stock in high-tech industries reached over $1.6 trillion in 2016 and supported 2.1 million jobs in the United States. In fact, the high-tech component of FDI is quite robust – nearly 44 percent of all FDI in the United States is invested in high-tech industries.

Compensation, R&D, Exports and Value-Added Activities

Beyond employment, FDI in high-tech sectors has other significant contributions to the U.S. economy.

The U.S. affiliates of foreign-owned firms typically offer higher wages compared to domestic firms. In addition, companies engaged in FDI in high-tech industries offer higher average pay compared to FDI companies in other industries – more than $101,000 per worker.

U.S. affiliates of foreign-owned firms in the high-tech sector also spend nearly $42 billion on research and development (R&D). In 2015, they also contributed $154 billion towards U.S. goods exports and more than $373 billion towards value-added activities.

Source Markets Supporting High-Tech
We also find that Germany, the United Kingdom, France, and Japan are among the largest source markets for R&D spending, exports and value-added activities in high-tech industries. Beyond that, they are also the US’s traditional trading partners. Collaborating with them on FDI reinforces our trade relationships and strengthens the US’s bilateral ties with these partners.

MBDA Director Visits China on Business Opportunity Trade Mission

MBDA National Director David Hinson, along with a 27-member delegation of U.S. corporate executives and minority-owned businesses, recently completed a China Business Opportunity Trade Mission to Beijing, Tianjin and Shanghai. The goal of the trade mission was to meet with potential corporate, government and university partners and attend the Minority Supplier Development (MSD) China Summit and Business Opportunity Fair.

The trip was organized by the National Minority Supplier Diversity Council (NMSDC) to foster business relations between American corporate and minority-owned businesses, corporate members of MSD China, and Chinese ethnic minority businesses that are not a part of the Han Chinese majority in China and Taiwan.

Director Hinson was a keynote speaker at the MSD China Summit and Business Opportunity Fair, held Sept. 1-2 at the Tasly International Conference Center in Tianjin. In his remarks, he encouraged participants to join in helping minority suppliers gain more business opportunities within the global economy.

The annual event brought together 80 corporate executives, minority supplier development professionals and purchasing executives, along with a host of Chinese and U.S. government officials, and about 100 minority business owners from China and the U.S. The Summit also included several delegations from ethnic minority regions within China.

“Among those core values that citizens of the United States and China share is the belief that we owe our success to the ingenuity, intellect and creativity of our people,” Hinson said.

Over the course of the two days, the Summit provided a forum for an exchange of ideas and included workshops onBusiness Opportunities with Multinational Corporations; Starting a Business in China: Practical Advice from Experts; How Traditional Chinese Medicine Goes International; and The Development of Chinese Ethnic Minorities and Chinese Minority Business Enterprises.

MSD China is the country’s first, national non-profit membership organization dedicated to enhancing the development of the 56 non-majority Chinese ethnic groups in business by connecting minority suppliers to corporations for procurement opportunities on a mutually beneficial basis.

The U.S. delegation attending the event included representatives from Dell, IBM, United Technologies Corporation, The Boeing Company, Hewlett-Packard Company, Marriott International, Inc., Merck, PepsiCo, and several minority businesses and leaders from the NMSDC. The China trade mission ran from Aug. 29 through Sept. 5.

Director Hinson’s time in China also included meetings in Beijing to discuss MBDA’s globalization program and objectives, investment opportunities in China, and current merger and acquisition trends. In addition, he met with the School of Continuing Education at Tsinghua University for an overview of its globalization program and to discuss minority business enterprise matching and the possibility of a joint program between Tsinghua and U.S. universities.

The Business Opportunity Trade Mission is a part of MBDA’s ongoing efforts to create access for minority businesses and broaden domestic and global opportunities through strategic partnerships.

Readout of the President’s Meeting with General Zulkifeli of Malaysia

On August 24, 2017, President Donald J. Trump met with General Zulkifeli bin Muhammad Zin, Director General of the Malaysian National Security Council, accompanied by Malaysia’s Ambassador to the United States, Zulhasnan Rafique, and expressed the gratitude of the United States for the Malaysian Coast Guard, Royal Malaysian Navy, and Royal Malaysian Air Force’s help in recovering the fallen United States sailors of the USS John S. McCain. The President also told General Zulkifeli that he looks forward to welcoming Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak to the White House on September 12. General Zulkifeli was in Washington, D.C., to meet with Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs LTG H.R. McMaster. Noting the 60th anniversary of United States-Malaysia relations, LTG McMaster and General Zulkifeli discussed ways to strengthen bilateral ties, particularly in trade and investment, as well as defense and security cooperation. A stronger partnership in these areas will help the two countries address shared challenges and promote regional peace and stability, including the fight to defeat ISIS and other extremist networks. 

关于联盟智库(ClE)

联盟智库是经美国政府批准的非盈利、非学历制的独立法人教育机构,自创建伊始受到了美国社会各界的欢迎和赞誉。学院位于美国西海岸城市洛杉矶,凭借联合国组织、联邦政府的商务部及国际贸易代表、劳工部、财政部、农业部、能源部等资源,组建了公共管理、工商经贸、投资金融、商业法律等多领域的顾问团队。为社会各界提供定制的高端培训课程和开展课题研究。

联盟智库(CIE)通过培训帮助学员更深入了解亚太商业投资环境,推动经贸合作与交流、促进实现合作共赢。联盟教育学院充分利用坚实的社会基础和与政府机构、行业协会、企业团体建立的良好合作关系,提供高端的定制培训课程及服务,安排学术与文化交流,策划组织高级公关活动,组织专业性商务考察,组织参观、参加专业展会,市场调研与咨询,投资融资、法律调研与咨询,税务调研与咨询,协助建立与相对国对接企业或团体的合作与联盟。

联盟智库CIE)凭借丰富的资源,已成为政府组织、行业协会、工商企业等开展教育培训的合作伙伴。

联盟智库(CIE)率先开设的国际企业总裁课程引领工商界成功人士成为世界级的工商管理领袖,通过高层经理培训课程为迅速发展的企业和公司培养国际化高级经营管理精英,从经贸发展中砥砺智慧、洞悉运筹之道,拓展人脉,创造商机。学员除了通过培训增加最新学识,更可建立政商人脉资源,特别是藉以参与国际经济发展进程中的重大项目和活动的亲历体验,参加特邀访美企业代表团,访问考察自由贸易区,建立商机,拓展国际事业。

联盟智库是美国政府批准的501(c)(3)非营利教育机构,无论美国企业或个人向学院捐赠均可抵税。

欢迎合作交流。